Somatostatin and the lung

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Published on Friday, 01 September 2017

Abstract

Lung carcinoma is the most common cause of death in the western world and is increasing particularly among women.

Despite significant developments in our understanding of the molecular biology of this disease our ability to treat the various subtypes of lung cancer has been at a relative standstill for the past decade.

Novel approaches to the therapy of lung tumours are required.

Recent work has evaluated the potential role of somatostatin and its analogues in the treatment of lung cancer.

Experimental evidence has demonstrated that lung tumours, in particular small cell lung cancer (SCLC), may express somatostatin.

The significance of this expression has not yet been evaluated. Somatostatin receptors have been demonstrated on between 50–75% of SCLC cell lines and fresh tumour samples studied to date.

Using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues SCLC tumours may be detected and localised in patients through scintigraphic imaging techniques.

Studies have shown that SCLC cell line clonal proliferation may be inhibited in vitro with somatostatin analogues suggesting that the somatostatin receptors are functional.

In-vivo growth inhibition studies have likewise yielded encouraging results with growth inhibition of somatostatin receptor positive SCLC xenografts and receptor negative SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer cell line xenografts.

These latter result suggests that somatostatin analogues may inhibit tumour growth by indirect as well as direct means.

These findings have laid the ground for formal clinical trials in the future.

 

 

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See also:

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- Observations on the Report of a case of pulmonary adenocarcinoma with lymph node, hepatic and osseus metastasis;

- Congenital fibrosarcoma in complete remission with Somatostatin, Retinoids, Vitamin D3, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, Melatonin, Calcium, Chondroitin sulfate associated with low doses of Cyclophosphamide in a 14-year Follow Up;

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- Cyclophosphamide plus Somatostatin, Bromocriptin, Retinoids, Melatonin and ACTH in the Treatment of Low-grade Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas at Advanced Stage: Results of a Phase II Trial;

- Relapse of High-Grade Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Case Successfully Treated With Cyclophosphamide Plus Somatostatin, Bromocriptine, Melatonin, Retinoids, and ACTH;

- Low-grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma at Advanced Stage: A Case Successfully Treated With Cyclophosphamide Plus Somatostatin, Bromocriptine, Retinoids, and Melatonin;

- The Di Bella Method (DBM) improved survival, objective response and performance status in a retrospective observational clinical study on 55 cases of Lymphomas;

- Large B-cells Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Stage IV-AE: a Case Report;

- Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Stage III-B-E: a Case Report;

- Neuroblastoma: Complete objective response to biological treatment;

- A case of advanced Multiple Myeloma treated with Di Bella Method (DBM) into total remission for 13 years;

- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Long-Lasting Remission with Combination of Cyclophosphamide, Somatostatin, Bromocriptine, Retinoids, Melatonin, and ACTH;

- Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (grade IV – WHO 2007): a case of complete objective response achieved by means of the concomitant administration of Somatostatin and Octreotide – Retinoids – Vitamin E – Vitamin D3 – Vitamin C – Melatonin – D2 R agonists (Di Bella Method – DBM) associated with Temozolomide;

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- The Di Bella Method (DBM) improved survival, objective response and performance status in a retrospective observational clinical study on 122 cases of breast cancer;

- Complete objective response to biological therapy of plurifocal breast carcinoma.