Dietary vitamin E intake could reduce the risk of lung cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis

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Published on Wednesday, 06 February 2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Quantification of the association between the intake of vitamin E and risk of lung cancer is still conflicting. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies of vitamin E intake with the risk of lung cancer.

METHODS: Pertinent studies were identified by a search in PubMed and Web of Knowledge up to October 2014. Random-effect model was used to combine study-specific results. Publication bias was estimated using Egger's regression asymmetry test.

RESULTS: Ten articles reporting 11 studies (10 prospective studies and 1 case-control studies) involving 4434 lung cancer cases were used in this meta-analysis. The combined relative risk (RR) of lung cancer associated with vitamin E intake was 0.858 (95% CI=0.742-0.991) overall, significant protective associations were also found in America population (RR=0.862, 95% CI=0.715-0.996) and prospective studies (RR=0.913, 95% CI=0.827-0.996). No publication bias was found.

CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis indicated that vitamin E intake might decrease the risk of lung cancer, especially in America.

 

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See also:

- Official Web Site: The Di Bella Method;

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Alpha tocopheryl acetate/Vitamin E, approximately 20 grams per day orally);

- Solution of retinoids in vitamin E in the Di Bella Method biological multitherapy;

- All-Trans-Retinoic Acid (ATRA - analogues and/or derivatives) - In vitro, review and in vivo publications;

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - All-Trans Retinoic Acid, Analogues and/or Derivatives - Approximately 60mg per day orally: 40mg per day Beta-Carotene/β-Carotene, 10mg per day ATRA and 10mg per day Axerophthol palmitate);

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Calcium, 2 grams per day, orally);

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Vitamin C/Ascorbic Acid, 2–4 grams, twice a day orally);

- Vitamin D (analogues and/or derivatives) and cancer - In vitro, review and in vivo publications;

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Dihydrotachysterol, Alfacalcidol, synthetic Vitamin D3);

- Beta-Carotene or β-carotene in Solution of retinoids in vitamin E in the Di Bella Method biological multitherapy;

- Somatostatin, retinoids, melatonin, vitamin D, bromocriptine, and cyclophosphamide in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with low performance status;

- Somatostatin, retinoids, melatonin, vitamin D, bromocriptine, and cyclophosphamide in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma and low performance status;

- Observations on the Report of a case of pulmonary adenocarcinoma with lymph node, hepatic and osseus metastasis;

- The Di Bella Method (DBM) in the treatment of prostate cancer: a preliminary retrospective study of 16 patients and a review of the literature.