Highly favourable outcomes with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for metastatic rectal neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN)

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Published on Friday, 08 November 2019

Abstract

PURPOSE: Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN) is more common than other NEN origins, but is less commonly metastatic. However, when present, distant disease carries a particularly poor prognosis. Evidence guiding optimal treatment of such patients is lacking. We assessed PRRT outcomes in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR) positive metastatic rectal NEN from two referral centres.

METHODS: Patients treated with PRRT were retrospectively reviewed. Morphologic (RECIST 1.1), SSTR imaging responses and toxicity were assessed 3 months post-PRRT. Kaplan-Meier estimate was used to determine progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) from start of PRRT.

RESULTS: Twenty-seven consecutive patients (M = 20, age 31-81 years) were reviewed. The majority (70%) had ENETs grade 2 disease (19 patients), three had Grade 3, one Grade 1, and four not documented. Overall, 63% (10/16 patients with available FDG PET/CT) had FDG avid disease. Twenty-six patients were treated for disease progression. Most had 177Lu-DOTA-octreotate with median cumulative activity of 30 GBq, median four cycles. 14 patients had radiosensitising chemotherapy (5FU or capecitabine). At 3 months post-PRRT, CT disease control rate (DCR) was 96%: partial response was observed in 70% (19/27) and stable disease in 26%. All but one had partial SSTR imaging response. The median PFS was 29 months. Ten patients died, with median overall survival 81 months with a median follow-up of 67 months. Seventeen patients had further treatments after initial PRRT (10 had further cycles of PRRT). Three patients had grade 3 lymphopenia, without significant renal toxicity, MDS or leukaemia.

CONCLUSION: Our results indicate high efficacy and morphologic responses with minimal toxicity and very encouraging survival from PRRT in patients with metastatic rectal NEN despite the adverse prognostic features of this cohort. Further prospective PRRT trials are warranted in this subgroup.

 

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See also:

- Official Web Site: The Di Bella Method;

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Somatostatin, Octreotide, Sandostatin LAR, analogues and/or derivatives);

- Somatostatin in oncology, the overlooked evidences - In vitro, review and in vivo publications;

- Publication, 2018 Jul: Over-Expression of GH/GHR in Breast Cancer and Oncosuppressor Role of Somatostatin as a Physiological Inhibitor (from Di Bella's Foundation);

- Publication, 2018 Sep: The over-expression of GH/GHR in tumour tissues with respect to healthy ones confirms its oncogenic role and the consequent oncosuppressor role of its physiological inhibitor, somatostatin: a review of the literature (from Di Bella's Foundation);

- Publication, 2019 Aug: The Entrapment of Somatostatin in a Lipid Formulation: Retarded Release and Free Radical Reactivity (from Di Bella's Foundation);

- Publication, 2019 Sep: Effects of Somatostatin and Vitamin C on the Fatty Acid Profile of Breast Cancer Cell Membranes (from Di Bella's Foundation);

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Bromocriptine and/or Cabergoline);

- The Di Bella Method (A Fixed Part - Cyclophosphamide 50mg tablets and/or Hydroxyurea 500mg tablets, one or two per day);

- Oesophageal squamocellular carcinoma: a complete and objective response;

- Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: clinical records on 17 patients treated with Di Bella's Method;

- The Di Bella Method Increases by the 30% the survival rate for Pancreas tumors and for this reason should be proposed as first line therapy for this type of cancer;

- Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (grade IV – WHO 2007): a case of complete objective response achieved by means of the concomitant administration of Somatostatin and Octreotide – Retinoids – Vitamin E – Vitamin D3 – Vitamin C – Melatonin – D2 R agonists (Di Bella Method – DBM) associated with Temozolomide;

- The Di Bella Method DBM improved survival objective response and performance status in a retrospective observational clinical study on 23 tumours of the head and neck;

- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Long-Lasting Remission with Combination of Cyclophosphamide, Somatostatin, Bromocriptine, Retinoids, Melatonin, and ACTH;

- Neuroblastoma: Complete objective response to biological treatment.